I could eat pumpkin every day in autumn and love pumpkin soup, especially the ones made from Hokkaido pumpkins. However, to get some variety in my diet, I tried different recipes and also experimented with pumpkin soup. The result was this incredibly delicious Japanese Miso Pumpkin Soup. A dream – and so creamy!

As I love Asian cuisine, it was obvious that I would also try Asiatic spices and pastes. Unfortunately, some flavours didn’t go well with pumpkin soup at all, but miso worked very well. This paste gave the soup a wonderfully spicy and strong umami taste — a much more intense hearty taste than a traditional pumpkin soup. Maybe the Hokkaido pumpkin works incredibly well with miso paste, as both products have their origin in Japan. Who knows. 😀

I was immediately convinced by the soup and was immediately reminded of Japanese cuisine, in which umami pastes are used in many recipes. I made the soup without coconut milk, but if you prefer pumpkin-coconut soup, you can, of course, add some if you like. That would also work wonderfully in terms of taste.

The Japanese cuisine itself is very healthy because many different fresh ingredients are used, and they are always freshly prepared. The Japanese also pay attention to the composition of the elements. The more varied the food, the more good ingredients are combined and the healthier it is. Pumpkin is an excellent choice to bring this healthy way of preparation into our kitchens. It contains countless healthy ingredients, minerals, secondary plant substances and vitamins. It is also a real slimming product. It has few calories, but at the same time satiates for a long time: a real all-rounder and a superfood par excellence. 

If you would like to learn more about the advantages and ingredients of pumpkins, then take a look at my Extra-Light Traditional Pumpkin Soup Recipe. In this article, I have highlighted all the benefits. There you will also find tips on how to prepare pumpkins optimally and how not to lose essential vitamins. Feel free to have a closer look.

Japanese-German-Miso-Pumpkin-Soup_Close-up_Soup bowls with wooden spoon_cashews and coriander
Japanese-German-Miso-Pumpkin-Soup_Close-up_Soup bowls with wooden spoon_cashews and coriander

Good to know!

Japanese cuisine is incredibly healthy because it is rich in vegetables, rice, fish and seafood, soy products and green tea. Due to the predominantly vegetable-based diet, the menu contains a lot of healthy fatty acids, antioxidants, plant substances and vitamins. Meat, animal fat and sugar are rarely eaten.

The last 3 tips before you can start:

1. Eat the pumpkin rind too.

You don’t have to peel the pumpkin to be able to process it further. The skin can also be eaten. It contains many vitamins and minerals that you shouldn’t miss. For me, it is also the best part of the pumpkin, as it has a nutty, sweet taste. When raw, the rind appears really hard, but when cooked it becomes soft and can be mashed together with the pulp. 

2. Roast the pumpkin in the oven.

You will get the best taste if you roast the pumpkin in the oven (not over 180°C) instead of cooking it in a pot. In addition to the roasting flavours, which will definitely enhance the flavour of your soup, the taste is concentrated in the pumpkin during roasting instead of being diluted by absorbed liquid. No healthy ingredients are lost during roasting either. 

3. Eat it with some oil.

The pumpkin soup should be eaten with a small dash of healthy vegetable oil, to increase the absorption of vitamins in the body. In my opinion, pumpkin seed oil or sesame oil are the best flavours. 

Find more information on how to prepare pumpkins best and to make the most out of its vitamins, here.

 

Japanese Miso Pumpkin Soup Recipe

Japanese-German-Miso-Pumpkin-Soup_Flatlay_two Soup bowls with cashews and coriander
Japanese-German-Miso-Pumpkin-Soup_Close-up_Flatlay_Soup bowls with cashews and coriander

Preparation

Timer_black and white_15 minutes

Cooking

Timer_black and white_45 minutes

Level

Cooking Level_Level 1_Easy

Nutrition facts per serving:

Calories: 415kcal

Carbohydrates: 43g
Protein: 8g
Fat: 23g

Ingredients

4 servings

Soup:

1kg hokkaido pumpkin

5 carrots

1 onion

1 garlic bulb

30ml olive oil

1,5 l vegetable broth (or 1l vegetable broth and 300 ml coconut milk)

1 tbsp miso paste

1 lemon (juice of a lemon)

1/4 chilli pod (without seeds) or chilli powder

salt & pepper

Garnish:

coriander green

roasted cashews

pumpkin seed oil or sesame oil

 

Instructions

1

Preheat the oven to 180°C (365°F) top/bottom heat.

2

Wash the pumpkin properly, divide it into two parts and remove the fibres and pumpkin seeds. Divide the pumpkin halves further into smaller pieces. These should be about the size of half an onion. Then lay out a baking tray with baking paper and spread the pumpkin pieces on it.

3

Peel the carrots and the onions and cut them into large pieces, so that the pieces are similar in size to the pumpkin pieces. Put them also on the baking tray. Peel the ginger, cut it into smaller pieces and put it aside.

4

Cut a whole garlic bulb in half horizontally (with the peel). In such a way that you divide the individual cloves. The peel contains most of the aromas, which is why it should be roasted as well. Place the two parts of the garlic on the tray.

5

Now spread the olive oil over the vegetables on the baking tray and give it into the oven. Let the vegetable roast at 180°C for about 30-45 minutes. Make sure to use top and bottom heat; circulating air dries out the pumpkin flesh. The roasting time varies slightly from oven to oven. The pumpkin is ready when it can be plucked with a fork, and the surface is slightly browned.

6

Take the vegetables out of the oven and put a part of the pumpkin in a separate bowl. These pieces can then be used as a soup garnish. Put the rest of the vegetables in a high-speed blender. You can now press the individual cloves out of the garlic bulb or scrape them out with a spoon and put them in the blender, throw the skin away. Then add some vegetable stock, the miso paste, chilli and lemon juice.

Tip: If you don’t have a blender, you can also put all the ingredients in a pot and puree them with a hand blender.

7

Mix all ingredients until you have a creamy texture. While mixing, add the vegetable stock until the soup has the desired consistency. If your soup is still too firm after the indicated amount of liquid has been used up, you can add some more vegetable stock or water until the soup has the consistency you want. Add salt and pepper to season your soup.

Tip: Instead of the whole vegetable stock, you can also use just 1l stock and 300ml coconut milk. That gives your pumpkin soup even more an Asian touch.

8

Pour the soup into your soup bowls, sprinkle it with some pumpkin seed oil and garnish your soup with some coriander green and roasted cashews.

Enjoy jour Japanese Miso Pumpkin Soup!

Final Tipp:

If you prefer to eat your pumpkin as puree, you can use the same recipe. Just use less water until the consistency is thick and smooth.

Perfect roasted pumpkin seeds:

  • Remove the pumpkin seeds from the pulp and fibres.
  • Let the seeds dry for a day at best. (But this is not a must)
  • Heat the seeds with the white skin in the oven or pan until the skin bursts open.
  • Then you can season the seeds as you like and roast them in the oven or pan.
Japanese-German-Miso-Pumpkin-Soup_Flatlay_two Soup bowls with wooden spoon, cashews and coriander
Japanese-German-Miso-Pumpkin-Soup_Close-up_two Soup bowls with cashews and coriander

Our Tip

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Japanese-German-Miso-Pumpkin-Soup_Flatlay_two Soup bowls with wooden spoon, cashews and coriander

Japanese Miso Pumpkin Soup

I tried different recipes and experimented with pumpkin soup. The result was this incredibly delicious Japanese Miso Pumpkin Soup. A dream – and so creamy!
Prep Time 14 mins
Cook Time 45 mins
Total Time 1 hr
Course Lunch, Main Course, Side Dish
Cuisine American, German, Japanese
Servings 4 servings
Calories 424 kcal

Equipment

  • High-Speed Blender or Hand Blender

Ingredients
  

Soup

  • 1 kg Hokkaido pumpkin
  • 5 carrots
  • 1 onion
  • 1 garlic bulb
  • 30 ml olive oil
  • 1,5 l vegetable broth (or 1l vegetable broth and 300 ml coconut milk)
  • 1 tbsp miso paste
  • 1 lemon (juice of a lemon)
  • 1/4 chilli pod (without seeds) or chilli
  • salt & pepper

Garnish

  • coriander green
  • roasted cashews
  • pumpkin seed oil or sesame oil

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven to 180°C (365°F) top/bottom heat.
  • Wash the pumpkin properly, divide it into two parts and remove the fibres and pumpkin seeds. Divide the pumpkin halves further into smaller pieces. These should be about the size of half an onion. Then lay out a baking tray with baking paper and spread the pumpkin pieces on it.
  • Peel the carrots and the onions and cut them into large pieces, so that the pieces are similar in size to the pumpkin pieces. Put them also on the baking tray. Peel the ginger, cut it into smaller pieces and put it aside.
  • Cut a whole garlic bulb in half horizontally (with the peel). In such a way that you divide the individual cloves. The peel contains most of the aromas, which is why it should be roasted as well. Place the two parts of the garlic on the tray.
  • Now spread the olive oil over the vegetables on the baking tray and give it into the oven. Let the vegetable roast at 180°C for about 30-45 minutes. Make sure to use top and bottom heat; circulating air dries out the pumpkin flesh. The roasting time varies slightly from oven to oven. The pumpkin is ready when it can be plucked with a fork, and the surface is slightly browned.
  • Take the vegetables out of the oven and put a part of the pumpkin in a separate bowl. These pieces can then be used as a soup garnish. Put the rest of the vegetables in a high-speed blender. You can now press the individual cloves out of the garlic bulb or scrape them out with a spoon and put them in the blender, throw the skin away. Then add some vegetable stock, the miso paste, chilli and lemon juice.
    Tip: If you don’t have a blender, you can also put all the ingredients in a pot and puree them with a hand blender.
  • Mix all ingredients until you have a creamy texture. While mixing, add the vegetable stock until the soup has the desired consistency. If your soup is still too firm after the indicated amount of liquid has been used up, you can add some more vegetable stock or water until the soup has the consistency you want. Add salt and pepper to season your soup.
    Tip: Instead of the whole vegetable stock, you can also use just 1l stock and 300ml coconut milk. That gives your pumpkin soup even more an Asian touch.
  • Pour the soup into your soup bowls, sprinkle it with some pumpkin seed oil and garnish your soup with some coriander green and roasted cashews.
    Enjoy jour Japanese Miso Pumpkin Soup!

Notes

Final Tipp:
If you prefer to eat your pumpkin as puree, you can use the same recipe. Just use less water until the consistency is thick and smooth.

Perfect roasted
 pumpkin seeds:
  • Remove the pumpkin seeds from the pulp and fibres.
  • Let the seeds dry for a day at best. (But this is not a must)
  • Heat the seeds with the white skin in the oven or pan until the skin bursts open.
  • Then you can season the seeds as you like and roast them in the oven or pan.
Keyword Fall Recipes, pumpkin, Pumpkin Soup, Soup, Vegan, Vegetarian
Japanese-Miso-Pumpkin-Soup_Soup bowls with wooden spoon, cashews and coriander
Japanese-Miso-Pumpkin-Soup_Soup bowls with cashews and coriander

Did you make this recipe? Let me know in the comments how you liked it!

Find more soup recipes on my Pinterest board: Soup Recipe Ideas.

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